John Brown’s Farm

Other Gravestone With House In Backround.

Other Gravestone With House In Backround.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






When I arrived at John Brown’s farm, I visited the statue of John Brown where there is a quote on the statue which says “His Soul Goes Marching On.” The statue was dedicated on May 9th, 1935 by the John Brown Assn. I next learned about John Brown on informational plaques posted around the farm. John was an abolitionist who was born in 1800 and died in 1859. He was born in Connecticut but raised in Ohio.

John Brown came to North Elba in 1849 and purchased another farm before going back to Ohio in 1851. He came back to North Elba in 1855 and purchased the farm but was only able to stay for a few weeks because he helped his sons in the fight against slavery. He did send money and supplies back to the family and was able to occasionally visit.

He was part of the raid on Harper’s Ferry on October 16, 1859. The raid took 1 year of planning before they were able to execute it. They wanted to start a rebellion against the American government to free the slaves, but the army surrounded the building and the raid failed. John Brown was captured and two of his sons were killed in the fighting, along with several other people. John Brown was given a trial and then hanged.

I next went to the gravestone at the farm. There are 12 people buried in 3 graves, not including Brown. In the center grave, there are 3 people buried including John Brown, John Brown’s son, and Watson Brown. The other 2 graves hold 10 people who died in the raid on Harper’s Ferry.

The grave with Brown in it has 5 names on the stone. Those 5 names consist of Captain John Brown(Father), John Brown, and Watson, Oliver, and Fredrick Brown(all sons). After Brown’s death, his wife and several of his children stayed at the farm until they moved to California in 1863.

I was then given a tour by the tour guide, Mrs. Eaton. I learned that the house was built by Henry Thompson. In the main room(Living Room), there is furniture from the Brown’s. After they moved, the house was sold to Alexis Hinckley, a relative. In 1870, New York State purchased the farm with caretakers taking care of it from 1870-1875. Kate Field, a journalist and lecturer raised funds with the help from the Union League Club to help preserve the farm.

View From Farmhouse.

View From Farmhouse.

image

Example Of Informational Plaques.

John's House.

John’s House.

Statue Of John Brown.

Statue Of John Brown

Other Gravestone With House In Backround.

Other Gravestone With House In Backround.

Another Angle Of John Brown's House.

Another Angle Of John Brown’s House.

Main Gravestone.

Main Gravestone.

Other Gravestone With House In Backround.

Other Gravestone With House In Backround.

House With Pond.

House With Pond.